Less litigation in divorce cases results in better lives for kids

Divorce is often something that affects not only the lives of a husband and wife, but it also dearly affects the lives of any minor children involved. Understandably, there are a number of frustrations that sometimes arise throughout the entire legal process. Filing for a divorce can be complicated and frustrating, as a couple sorts through shared assets, trying to determine an equitable property division while also addressing child custody and child support issues.

Over the years, studies have documented that disastrous court fights and unnecessary legal hassles are not necessary if the parents simply decide to work together and put their child's best interests first instead of their own. In combination with counseling and education, mediation may not only help the parents, but it may well save the sanity of the children ensnared by the marital dissolution. Mediation and other support services may interest Maryland couples with children when considering divorce.

It has been shown that litigation is significantly reduced with mediation, thanks to the way that mothers and fathers learn to work hand-in-hand. In a particular study, mothers were able to reduce litigation by growing to support the involvement of the father in the children's lives. At the same time, fathers were able to reduce litigation by increasing their consistency and support with their children, implementing an effective parenting plan, thereby reducing potentially negative changes with their father-child relationship.

Overall, there are a number of services offered to mothers and fathers in Maryland and throughout the country so that when divorce is inevitable for a couple, the children do not have to suffer through an often harmful legal battle and litigation. Most parties are able to agree that seeing a child suffer from a lengthy divorce battle is discouraging and usually unnecessary. Ultimately, less litigation may lead to better outcomes for the children as well as the adults throughout the divorce process and its aftermath.

Source: The Huffington Post, "How To Prevent Litigation In Divorce Disputes," Robert Hughes, Jr., March 27, 2012